Apprendre les langues arabe et française
Vous souhaitez réagir à ce message ? Créez un compte en quelques clics ou connectez-vous pour continuer.
Le Deal du moment : -28%
Précommande : Smartphone Google Pixel 8a 5G ...
Voir le deal
389 €

The English and its Semitic origin

Page 1 sur 4 1, 2, 3, 4  Suivant

Aller en bas

The English and its Semitic origin Empty The English and its Semitic origin

Message par منصور Sam 9 Sep - 21:51

السلام عليكم ورحمة الله وبركاته




Semitic origins already listed:






The thread about investigation on the Semitic origins of English:

Let us present here the difficulties to find a Semitic origin of the English vocabulary or any other European language: the set of Semitic phones is very similar to the set of phones of all the European nations, which already in itself is an obvious proof of a Semitic origin, thus, etymological research must take into account phonetic variations, for example the similarity between a t and a d, a v or b or f, a w and a u, a p and a b or f, etc. In addition, certain Semitic phones are hidden in Latin, such as the emphatic T ط and our common t ت.

In this first subject, the ambiguous English phones here is the H which would be ح, a slightly raspy h in the throat.

Harsh


According to Etymonline harske means "rough, coarse, sour" and came from Sanskrit kasati. And yes, from the 19th century, language historians thought that European vocabulary came from India, or from the same tribe as the European one; the myth of a proto-Indo-European language was born.

حرش

Pronounced HaRaSha, a slightly rough h.

حَرَشٌ : Roughness, harshness, or coarseness, as also حُرْشَةٌ, or roughness of the skin.
Funny to see the word harsh within the explanation here.

The verb حَرَشَهُ : He scratched, or rubbed, the camel so as to abrade the upper skin, and make it bleed. And surprisingly, etymonline tells us the word Harsh came from old French Card.

The word and verbs have various others meaning, see here.


Dernière édition par منصور le Ven 22 Déc - 0:02, édité 3 fois

______________________________________________________




Le clavier arabe sur son ordinateur, cliquer ici.
منصور
منصور

Messages : 2736
Points : 3365
Date d'inscription : 26/09/2013

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

The English and its Semitic origin Empty Semitic origin of Fire et Furious

Message par منصور Sam 9 Sep - 22:07

Furious

The term furious and Four (oven in french) which according to the CNTRL is formed on the lat. furia, v. furie for the first, and furnus for the second.

فَارَ, aor. يَفُورُ, says of the water, and فَارَتْ, aor. تَفُورُ, said of a pot, inf. n. فَوْرٌ and فَوَرَانٌ, and فُؤُورٌ, and فُوَارٌ : It was boiling.

فار فَائِرُهُ : He seethed with anger, or he became angry, or he was overcome with anger.

فَوْرٌ nominal infinitive: Combustion, or the heat and boiling of Hell. And the intensity, or vehemence, of the heat.
We note here the link between the Arabic word Foor which we find in the french-latin word Enfer (hell) which the CNRTL was not able to identify.

Same Semitic origin for the term Fire and french one Feu (from Foyer) despite the stubbornness of a supposed Proto-Indo-European origin: Old English fyr "fire, a fire," from Proto-Germanic *fūr- (source also of Old Saxon fiur, Old Frisian fiur , Old Norse fürr, Middle Dutch and Dutch vuur, Old High German fiur, German Feuer "fire") which links it to the term paewr, so far yes, the P equivalent to the F, but very strangely to an enigmatic proto-Indo-European language and its egni for fire/feu.


Dernière édition par منصور le Sam 21 Oct - 1:46, édité 1 fois

______________________________________________________




Le clavier arabe sur son ordinateur, cliquer ici.
منصور
منصور

Messages : 2736
Points : 3365
Date d'inscription : 26/09/2013

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

The English and its Semitic origin Empty Semitic origin of Bed

Message par منصور Sam 9 Sep - 22:26

Bed


According to etymonline, the word Bed comes from bett for couch, resting place; garden plot. Here the phone turns from a t toward a d.

We know all the famous city named Bethlehem which means The House of subsistance (food, bread), so the word Beth, בַּיִת.

بَاتَ : he was in the night, or at night, or during the night, doing such a thing ; بَاتَ زَيْدٌ نَائِمًا : Zeyd was in the night, or passed, or spent, the night sleeping, and he remained, continued, stayed, or dwelt, and he alighted and abode, by night.

______________________________________________________




Le clavier arabe sur son ordinateur, cliquer ici.
منصور
منصور

Messages : 2736
Points : 3365
Date d'inscription : 26/09/2013

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

The English and its Semitic origin Empty Semitic origin of Soft

Message par منصور Lun 11 Sep - 0:33

Soft


Old English softe: gentle, mild-natured, easeful, comfortable, calm, undisturbed, luxurious. From Old Saxon safti, Old High German semfti, from PIE root *sem-. From: etymonline.
Here is another oddity from the inventors of a language called Proto-Indo-European.

سَفُطَ, aor. ـُ {يَسْفُطُ}, inf. n. سَفَاطَةٌ: He was, or became cheerful, happy, or free from straitness, in mind, liberal, bountiful, or munificent.

سَفَطٌ A thing like a جُوَالِق [or sack], or like a قُفَّة [or basket woven of palm-leaves], in which are stowed perfume and similar things, of the apparatus of women.

______________________________________________________




Le clavier arabe sur son ordinateur, cliquer ici.
منصور
منصور

Messages : 2736
Points : 3365
Date d'inscription : 26/09/2013

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

The English and its Semitic origin Empty Semitic origin of Fur

Message par منصور Mer 27 Sep - 22:23

Fur


From etymonline : late 14c. "trimming or lining of a garment" (implied c. 1300 in surname Furhode "fur hood"), probably from Old French forrer, fourrer "cover with fur, line (clothing).
From old french forrëure der. from verb fourrer.


فَرْوٌ : A certain thing that is worn, as also فَرْوَةٌ, applied when it is [a furred garment] like the جُبِّة, and signifies also a skin, a kind of garment, well known, lined with the skins of various species of animals, the most highly esteemed whereof is the سَمَّور [or sable], tanned, and sewed together, this garment being worn for preservation from the cold.

جُبَّةٌ مُفَرَّاةٌ [A furred جبّة;] a [garment of the kind called] جبّة upon which is a فَرْوَة [or fur, i. e., that is lined therewith].



______________________________________________________




Le clavier arabe sur son ordinateur, cliquer ici.
منصور
منصور

Messages : 2736
Points : 3365
Date d'inscription : 26/09/2013

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

The English and its Semitic origin Empty Re: The English and its Semitic origin

Message par Contenu sponsorisé


Contenu sponsorisé


Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Page 1 sur 4 1, 2, 3, 4  Suivant

Revenir en haut

- Sujets similaires

 
Permission de ce forum:
Vous ne pouvez pas répondre aux sujets dans ce forum