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The English and its Semitic origin

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The English and its Semitic origin - Page 2 Empty Semitic origin of Fall

Message par منصور Dim 1 Oct - 15:24

Fall

Let us see again the manifest stubbornness of linguists avoiding the Semitic culture and origin of European languages, linking their origin to a language invented in the 19th century, a reconstituted language, called proto-Indo-European, of a mythical tribe having generated the European white breed.

From etymonline: Old English feallan (class VII strong verb; past tense feoll, past participle feallen) "to drop from a height; fail, decay, die," from Proto-Germanic *fallanan (source also of Old Frisian falla, Old Saxon fallan, Dutch vallen, Old Norse falla, Old High German fallan, German fallen, absent in Gothic).

These are from PIE root *pol- "to fall" (source also of Armenian p'ul "downfall".

This is exact, the P is often from the semitic F.

Hebrew : נָפַל verb : to fall, to stumble, to drop, to decline, to collapse, to be defeated, to surrender, to be conquered, to be killed, to fall by the wayside (a proposal, plan) ; (colloquial) to fall on (a day, date), to descend, to be inferior to.

Arabic : فَلٌّ noun : portion that has fallen off from a thing, like the filings of gold and of silver, and the sparks of fire.
The verb : فَلَّهُ, aor. ـُ {يَفْلُلُ}, inf. n. فَلٌّ : He broke it, or notched it, in its edge. And also He defeated the army, or military force, or the people, or party.

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The English and its Semitic origin - Page 2 Empty Semitic origin of Barren

Message par منصور Dim 8 Oct - 3:52

Barren


From etymonline : "incapable of producing its kind" (of female animals, plants), from Old French baraigne, baraing "sterile, barren" (12c.), perhaps originally brahain, a word of obscure derivation, possibly from a Germanic language.

From the lane's lexicon : أَرْضٌ بَرِّيَّةٌ Uncultivated land; without seed-produce, and unfruitful; without green herbs or leguminous plants and without waters; contr. of رِيفِيَّةٌ.

The semantic field of this Semitic etymon BR is the transit, to cross, that which comes and goes. In Arabic and Aramaic, it will also take on the meaning of gratitude, kindness to parents or in sociaty, hence the meaning of the Aramaic qualifier “son of God”, “Bar Allah”, for Jesus. On that day, on one Roman torture was Bar A'bbas, and the other, supposed Bar Allah.

So, a barren land is this one we can cross easly. بَرٌّ : desert, waste. And also wide tract of land.
The Qur'an surah 10 verse 22 :


هُوَ الَّذِي يُسَيِّرُكُمْ فِي الْبَرِّ وَالْبَحْرِ
It is He who enables you to travel on land and sea


The Qur'an surah 80 verse 16 :


كِرَامٍ بَرَرَةٍ
Noble and dutiful



Dernière édition par منصور le Mer 22 Nov - 23:57, édité 1 fois

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The English and its Semitic origin - Page 2 Empty Semitic origin of Seven

Message par منصور Jeu 12 Oct - 2:45

Seven


From etymonline : Old English seofon, from Proto-Germanic *sebun (source also of Old Saxon sibun, Old Norse sjau, Swedish sju, Danish syv, Old Frisian sowen, siugun, Middle Dutch seven, Dutch zeven, Old High German sibun, German sieben, Gothic sibun), from PIE *septm "seven" (source also of Sanskrit sapta, Avestan hapta, Hittite shipta, Greek hepta, Latin septem, Old Church Slavonic sedmi, Lithuanian septyni, Old Irish secht, Welsh saith).

Despite this supposed PIE origin, here the semitic one :

سبّت is the seventh day of the week, saturday, which is the word Shabbat in hebrew, the Shin beeing equivalent with the arabic Sin. This is also a biblical origin, six days of creation and the last one, the seventh days.
The septimal system preceded the decimal system in ancient times. The seven came to close a cycle.

Here, the etymologists don't make the phonetic links between the consonants P and B, both labial, the relation between aryan and semitic set of phones.

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The English and its Semitic origin - Page 2 Empty Semitic origin of Obey

Message par منصور Mer 22 Nov - 23:52

Obey

From old french obëir. According to the CNRTL, this term comes to us from the Latin oboedire: “to give ear to someone” and then “to be submissive”.

The O is the representative of the Semitic letter ع, which alone means See, or more precisely Perceive, whether it is a sound or an image. The Greco-Latin grapheme O comes to us from the Phoenician, and still represents today a round Eye, Occulus in Latin. Who will deny the fact that our letters of the alphabet have an ancient meaning?

The Semitic term عبد obviously means the same thing and has the same etymological origin. First names like A'bd-ul (servant of) followed by one of God's name : A'bd-ul-Llah, A'bd-ul-Haqq, etc., all indicating a servant of God by one of His names.

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The English and its Semitic origin - Page 2 Empty Semitic origin of Rabbit ?

Message par منصور Mar 28 Nov - 2:19

Rabbit

According to the etymonline, this term comes to us from the wallon robète .


Here is a hypothesis for researching the origin of the word "rabbit", unknown until now.

First :
The structure of a word is not the result of chance, the word expresses what inspired the observed object, and from there, the name was born. Example, there is a country called Holland, which is Hol and Land, means Hollow Land because this country is closed to the level of the sea or under the sea, or Wood Land which is Holt Land, because this country was rich in wood.
Whatever the hypothesis here, the name of this country was built on what it evoked, and its morphology has preserved the meaning of this name.




The hypothesis of a Semitic origin for Rabbit (from Robéte in Wallonia) would be based on a major political event in the Middle Ages, the persecution of Jews and Muslims by the Catholic authorities in Iberia. Spain was then the most developed and civilized country in Europe, where universities used the language of sciences at that time, Arabic. In fact, the iberian Jews wrote and spoke Arabic, a language very close to Hebrew anyway. The hebrew was used for religious purpose.

To escape forced conversion to Catholicism, some of the Spanish Jews went to Wallonia, they found a people more tolerant than the Latin countries of southern Europe. There you have it, the Semitic vocabulary is actually established in Wallonia, and the word Robète appears at this time in history in Wallonia, in the 14th century.
The Robète became a breed specific to the Walloon region, and was sold in Great Britain under its Walloon name Robète, which became Rabbit. This is all hypothesis. For my part, I ask why there is a double B in Rabbit ? It shows a kind of emphasis on this middle letter.

So, in arabic the root RBT, see here ربط with emphatic T is related to tie, it was the way to tie a horse, or animal of the kind.

But there is a more serious hypothesis. In Hebrew and Arabic, the term Rabb fundamentally expresses the increase, what develops, hence the meaning of the name of the religious, the rabbis as was Jesus among his students and followers, and there, it's a question of development of science, the Mosaic laws and Jewish tradition, added to his own interpretations of the holies scriptures, as all Rabbis do.
It is awkwardly translated as Lord, in that the Rabb in Arabic or Hebrew also means the one who issues orders, advices and command, for a suitable developpement of a tribe or nation.

The Qur'an surah 1 verse 2 :


الْحَمْدُ لِلَّهِ رَبِّ الْعَالَمِينَ
The Praise is for Allah, Rabb of the Worlds


Let's return to the first meaning of the word Rabb, to increase, develop. The rabbit is identified in many cultures and countries as an animal that reproduces very quickly, and is difficult to control in the wild and agricultural areas.
Now a reputation can be written in the name that the object will bear.
The t suffixed to Rabb or Rob could be the mark of the feminine, or to give the meaning of an objet, non human.

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